703-354-2905

Presents

HIROMI ASHLIN

 Carins, Queensland, Australia

Town of Pearl #2

Quartet 1 - Country

Date: 2015

Size in:  37 x 56 1/2

Size cm:  94 x 144

Medium: Origami

Price: USD $5700

Framed in US, conservation acrylic

  Hiromi's "Town of Pearl #2" was the signature presentation piece at the Australian Embassy's September, 2015 Washington, DC exhibition, "The Art of Hiromi Ashlin". Framed by Broadway Galleries, the four panels measured a massive 10 feet x 9 feet. Subsequently, the panels were re-framed to highlight the four themes prevalent in the work, Country, Sky, Water and Pearl and retitled "Town of Pearl #2 - The Four Quartets". A more in-depth discussion of the work may be found on pages 13-14 of the Embassy Catalog.

 

Town of Pearl #2

Quartet 2 - Sky

Date: 2015

Size in:  37 x 56 1/2

Size cm:  94 x 144

Medium: Origami

Price: USD $5700

Framed in US, conservation acrylic

 

  Hiromi's "Town of Pearl #2" was the signature presentation piece at the Australian Embassy's September, 2015 Washington, DC exhibition, "The Art of Hiromi Ashlin". Framed by Broadway Galleries, the four panels measured a massive 10 feet x 9 feet. Subsequently, the panels were re-framed to highlight the four themes prevalent in the work, Country, Sky, Water and Pearl and retitled "Town of Pearl #2 - The Four Quartets". A more in-depth discussion of the work may be found on pages 13-14 of the Embassy Catalog.

 

Town of Pearl #2

Quartet 3 - Water

Date: 2015

Size in:  37 x 56 1/2

Size cm:  94 x 144

Medium: Origami

Price: USD $5700

Framed in US, conservation acrylic

 

   Hiromi's "Town of Pearl #2" was the signature presentation piece at the Australian Embassy's September, 2015 Washington, DC exhibition, "The Art of Hiromi Ashlin". Framed by Broadway Galleries, the four panels measured a massive 10 feet x 9 feet. Subsequently, the panels were re-framed to highlight the four themes prevalent in the work, Country, Sky, Water and Pearl and retitled "Town of Pearl #2 - The Four Quartets". A more in-depth discussion of the work may be found on pages 13-14 of the Embassy Catalog.

 

Town of Pearl #2

Quartet 4 - Pearl

Date: 2015

Size in:  37 x 56 1/2

Size cm:  94 x 144

Medium: Origami

Price: USD $5700

Framed in US, conservation acrylic

 

 Hiromi's "Town of Pearl #2" was the signature presentation piece at the Australian Embassy's September, 2015 Washington, DC exhibition, "The Art of Hiromi Ashlin". Framed by Broadway Galleries, the four panels measured a massive 10 feet x 9 feet. Subsequently, the panels were re-framed to highlight the four themes prevalent in the work, Country, Sky, Water and Pearl and retitled "Town of Pearl #2 - The Four Quartets". A more in-depth discussion of the work may be found on pages 13-14 of the Embassy Catalog.

 

Akano Shindo #1

Date: 2016

Size in: 24 x 30

Size cm: 60 x 76

Medium: Origami

Price: USD $2,150

Framed in US, conservation glass

 

   A "koan" is a paradoxical anecdote or riddle, used in Zen Buddhism to demonstrate the inadequacy of logical reasoning and to provoke enlightenment. The koan, "A Drop of Water", relates the story of a Zen master named Gisan who asked a young student to bring him a pail of water to cool his bath. The student brought the water and, after cooling the bath, threw the left over water on the ground. "You dunce!" the master scolded him, "Why didn't you give the rest of the water to the plants? What right have you to waste even a drop of water in this temple?" The young student attained Zen in that instant. He changed his name to Tekisui, which means a drop of water.

Akano Shindo #2

Date: 2016

Size in: 16 x 20

Size cm: 40 x 52

Medium: Origami

Price: USD $2,150

Framed in US, conservation glass

 

Same as Akano Shindo #1, but this work is more gentle and positive and speaks of energy and power. Lao Tsu said, “Water is fluid, soft, and yielding. But water will wear away rock, which is rigid and cannot yield. As a rule, whatever is fluid, soft, and yielding will overcome whatever is rigid and hard. This is another paradox: what is soft is strong.”

Kimsan #4

Date: 2016

Size in: 15 ¾ x 20 ½

Size cm: 40 x 52

Medium: Origami

Price: USD $1900

Framed in US, conservation glass

 

The inspiration for the origin of the Kimsan theme developed out of Hiromi's close friendship with a colleague who studied art with her during her teenage years. Hiromi's friend was from south Korea and she was much older. She didn’t talk much about art but Hiromi considered her a great artist. After more than 20 years after their last meeting, Hiromi felt she had received a message from her friend directing her to make the work. Kimsan #4 is a smaller version of the original composition.

Shiro Rimu (White Rim)

Date: 2015

Size in: 16 x 20

Size cm: 40 x 52

Medium: Origami

Price: USD $1,900

Framed in US, conservation glass

 

Composed from over six hundred individually folded origami elements, “Shiro Rimu (White Rim)” was created shortly after Hiromi Ashlin’s major 2015 exhibition opening at the Australian Embassy in Washington, D.C.,  and it continues her ongoing experimentation with how far one can push the embellishment and elaboration of individual origami elements.

 

“Shiro Rimu’s (White Rim’s)” origami elements are individually delineated by Hiromi with a hand-applied “white rim”, creating a striking contrast to the predominately black tonal ground.  The white ornamentation dramatically amplifies the work’s shimmering  movement, creating an energy field of  individual elements operating as a collective unity.  A line of red petals softly traverses downward across the vibrating unity of the predominate white and black elements.

 

Shadow Planet #1

Date: 2015

Size in: 18 x 22

Size cm: 46 x 56

Medium: Origami

Price: USD $2,500

Framed in US, conservation glass

 

In physical cosmology and astronomy, dark energy is a mysterious form of energy which is hypothesized to permeate all of space, tending to accelerate the expansion of the universe. Dark energy is the most accepted hypothesis to explain observations beginning in the 1990s which tend to indicate that the universe is expanding at an accelerating rate.

About this painting Hiromi says, "Using lots of black ink makes dark strong work.  I like to create strong heavy dark energy art piece using totally different material that is fragile and light.  Paper is the best material to do that. "

Shadow Planet #2

Date: 2015

Size in: 18 x 22

Size cm: 46 x 56

Medium: Origami

Price: USD $2,500

Framed in US, conservation glass

 

Describing her use of paper cranes to constitute the shadow of Dark Energy in the Universe, Hiromi explains the crane element is popularly used in Japanese origami for craft work and by children; however, traditionally, such works are usually colorful.  She goes on to say Planet Shadow # 1 and #2 were enjoyable creative efforts that allowed her to make something new and different from the traditional approach to employing the crane motif.

Shizuku (Rain Drop)

 

Date: 2015

Size in: 21 x 25

Size cm: 53 x 64

Medium: Origami

Price: USD $2,800

Framed in US, conservation glass

 

"Shizuku" ("Rain Drop") is a striking piece with heavy movement and contrasting colors.  Hiromi sprayed blue paint over a white petal pattern.  She then applied white paint selectively on petal tops.  The background is torn washi paper, glued around the work to create a soft organic look.

Indigo

Date: 2015

Size in: 16 x 20

Size cm: 40 x 52

Medium: Origami

Price: USD $1,900

Framed in US, conservation glass

 

"Indigo was inspired by the coloration of the Ningaloo Reef boarding Australia's western coastline. The Ningaloo Coast is a World Heritage Site located in the north west coastal region of Western Australia. The 705,015-hectare (1,742,130-acres) heritage–listed area is located approximately 1,200 kilometres (750 mi) north of Perth, along the East Indian Ocean. The distinctive Ningaloo Reef that fringes the Ningaloo Coast is 260 kilometres (160 mi) long and is Australia's largest fringing coral reef and the only large reef positioned very close to a landmass.

Kimono #3

Date: 2015

Size in: 16 x 20

Size cm: 41 x 51

Medium: Origami

Price: USD $1,875

Framed in US, conservation glass

 

In Kimono #3, Hiromi employs traditional Japanese papers (Uzen-washi) to form a geometrical sortie of fifty-three cranes set against a rich, calligraphic design backdrop. In Japan the Kimono motif is very popular with, and familiar to, art lovers.

 

The choice of papers and design layout are characteristic of the classical "old school" Japanese approach to the highly patterned look of silk wedding kimonos.

 

Because the folding of individual origami elements is so time-consuming, Hiromi is one of the few artists in the world capable of employing origami as a painting technique.  Consequently, "origami paintings" are extremely rare, even to Japanese audiences.   According to Hiromi, "Kimono #3" represents her idea of what a person from Japan might typically imagine an "origami artwork in a frame" would look like.

 

Kimono #2

Date: 2015

Size in: 17 x 21

Size cm: 43 x 53

Medium: Origami

Price: USD $1,875

Framed in US, conservation glass

 

A different depiction of "harmony" is addressed in "Kimono #2". This time we see cranes in movement flying westward (to the left).

 

The crane paper used in "Kimono #2" is "Kami", the most widely available origami paper. It was developed for use in schools. The word "Kami" is Japanese for paper, but it has acquired this specific meaning. Kami is thick and easy to fold. It is usually printed only on one side, but not always, and oftentimes it is a solid color or pattern. These patterns can be as simple as a gradation from red to blue, or as complex as a multi-colored kimono pattern of flowers and cranes with gold foil embellishments. Kami comes in several sizes, but standard sizes include 75 x 75 mm (about 3 x 3 inches), 6-inch squares, and 10-inch squares

 

The mounting background for "Kimono #2" is rice paper.

Tabi #2 (Journey)

Date: 2015

Size in: 25 x 21

Size cm: 63 x 53

Medium: Origami

Price: USD $2,700

Framed in US, conservation glass

 

This "journey" speaks of pearls that were washed by sea water at Reddell Beach near Broome, Western Australia.  Reddell Beach is a spiritual woman’s ceremonial spot for local Australian Aboriginal people. The women perform ceremonial dances at Reddell beach in the traditional way.

 

Hiromi often went to Reddell Beach with her children to collect little sand stones, to be together, and to meet with friends. One day Hiromi took numerous pearls to Reddell Beach and performed her own ceremony, letting them sink in the water between the red rocks that are scattered widely in the waters around Broome.

 

Hiromi frequently incorporates Reddell Beach pearls in her work to signify and honor ceremony and the important role it plays in daily life.

Senbazuru Warera Dokoeyuku

(1000 Cranes

 Where Are We Going?)

Date: 2013

Size in: 42x 42

Size cm: 107 x 107

Medium: Origami

Price: USD $4,750

Framed in AU, conservation glass

 

A stunning all-white composition employing the characteristic "1000 Cranes" motif.  In this work, as with many of Hiromi's other pieces, we discern a sense of quiet movement which is, paradoxically, active yet at the same time, peaceful.

 

The Buddhist concept of "Sunyata" has been invoked in  attempts to describe Hiromi's art.  The great American poet, Wallace Stevens, describes this state of being in his poem, "The Snow Man":

 

One must have a mind of winter

To regard the frost and the boughs

Of the pine-trees crusted with snow;

 

And have been cold a long time

To behold the junipers shagged with ice,

The spruces rough in the distant glitter

 

Of the January sun; and not to think

Of any misery in the sound of the wind,

In the sound of a few leaves,

 

Which is the sound of the land

Full of the same wind

That is blowing in the same bare place

 

For the listener, who listens in the snow,

And, nothing himself, beholds

Nothing that is not there and the nothing that is.

Soragamieru

(I Can See The Sky)

Date: 2013

Size in: 26 x 40

Size cm: 66 x 102

Medium: Origami

Price: USD $4,750

Framed in AU, acrylic

 

"Sorgamieru" was chosen as the Brisbane Finalist at the 2015 Cliftons Art Prize, QLD, an annual competition that helps raise the profiles of local artists and encourages corporate patronage of the arts.

 

The Clifton Art Prize offers international exposure for local artists across Asia Pacific. It is open to emerging and established artists in Australia, New Zealand, Hong Kong and Singapore.

 

Originally starting out as a "play" craft for her daughter at school, Hiromi took the concept to the ultimate artistic end point.  The painting is extremely complex, consisting of a multitude of box origami foldings of various sizes.  The papers were prepared by infusing colors into bubble water and then dropping the colored bubble water on the folding paper, creating beautiful blue patterns on each piece of origami paper.

 

Each of the colored papers were then reverse folded, capturing the pattern inside the box origami.  Hiromi then used lit incense to burn holes into selected box folds revealing the jewel-like blueish, bubbling pattern at the interior of each penetrated box origami.  She likens the effect to gazing inwards and seeing a beautiful blue sky.

Niji to Taiyo

(Rain Meets Sun)

Date: 2013

Size in: 33 x 43

Size cm: 84 x 109

Medium: Origami

Price: USD $4,065

Famed in AU, conservation glass

 

Niji to Taiyo (Rain Meets Sun), and Byakkudan (Sandlewood), demonstrate Hiromi’s growing interest in employing the technique of pyrography in her work.  Hiromi uses incense to create these ornaments, which are both spiritual and artistic in their design and execution. "Niji to Taiyo" and "Byakkudan" are the only two exhibited works executed solely using this special skill.

Byakudan

(Sandalwood)

Date: 2013

Size in: 33 x 43

Size cm: 84 x 109

Medium: Origami

Price: USD $4,065

Framed in US,  conservation glass

 

Niji to Taiyo (Rain Meets Sun), and Byakkudan (Sandlewood), demonstrate Hiromi’s growing interest in employing the technique of pyrography in her work.  Hiromi uses incense to create these ornaments, which are both spiritual and artistic in their design and execution. "Niji to Taiyo" and "Byakkudan" are the only two exhibited works executed solely using this special skill.

Interested in Hiromi?

Size in:  37 x 56